Blog Stats
  • Posts - 1188
  • Articles - 0
  • Comments - 0
  • Trackbacks - 0

 

Hotsites - New & Notable Sites for Engineering

9 search engines for science

Biomedical robots galore

'Buckypaper': stronger than steel, harder than diamonds.

Chemical synthesis database

Common job search traps and how to avoid them

Kiwi Research Information Service

Magic solar milestone reached

Ocean Special Area Management Plan

Race starts with little fuel, and goes uphill from there

Research seeks to replace service dogs with robots

Ruth Charney on modeling with cubes

Scientists engineer superconducting thin films

Tutorial on searching the Internet for images

Whales to wood, wood to coal/oil- What’s next?

When models outgrow hardware, turn to HPC

9 search engines for science
"There are several very good science/technology search engines. These will usually give much more focussed search results than Google."
Read more at http://hwlibrary.wordpress.com/2008/09/22/science-search-engines/

Biomedical robots galore
Videos of presentations "At the BioRob 2008 Conference, in Arizona, researchers from around the world gathered to present robots with a wide range of abilities--from mimicking the strange properties of living systems to aiding health outside and inside the human body. Video by Kristina Grifantini; edited by Brittany Sauser"
View and read more at http://www.technologyreview.com/video/?vid=133

'Buckypaper': stronger than steel, harder than diamonds.
" Nanotechnology Working with a material 10 times lighter than steel - but 250 times stronger - would be a dream come true for any engineer. If this material also had amazing properties that made it highly conductive of heat and electricity, it would start to sound like something out of a science fiction novel. Yet one Florida State University research group, the Florida Advanced Center for Composite Technologies (FAC2T), is working to develop real-world applications for just such a material. "
Read more at http://www.physorg.com/news7435.html

Chemical synthesis database
"ChemSynthesis is a freely accessible database of chemicals. This website contains substances with their synthesis references and physical properties such as melting point, boiling point and density. There are currently more than 40 000 compounds and more than 45 000 synthesis references in the database. "
Read more at http://www.chemsynthesis.com/index.html

Common Job Search Traps and How to Avoid Them
" Let's face it...if you are in a job search, the process can be a lot of work and very stressful. Often people end up sabotaging their efforts by focusing on poorly planned or low-yield activities. This can quickly lead to frustration and inertia. But with a little bit of education and planning, you can build efficiencies and accountability into your search campaign to make the process faster, more productive, and extremely rewarding. Below are five traps that job seekers often fall into and some tips for getting past these traps.Submitted by Barbara Safani on Thu, 08/21/2008 - 9:44pm "
Read more at http://www.ihispano.com/blogs/common-job-search-traps-and-how-avoid-them

Kiwi Research Information Service
" This website is a gateway to the open-access research documents produced at universities, polytechnics, and other research institutions throughout New Zealand. We have harvested research document metadata from around New Zealand and collected it in one place. You can use this website to search for research, look up specific subjects or authors, browse the research in various ways, and keep abreast of emerging research activity. If you're a researcher at a New Zealand institution, we encourage you to contribute your research outputs to your institution's"
Read more at http://nzresearch.org.nz/

Magic solar milestone reached
"31 October 2008 UNSW Engineering’s ARC Photovoltaic Centre of Excellence has again asserted its leadership in solar cell technology by reporting the first silicon solar cell to achieve the milestone of 25 per cent efficiency. The UNSW ARC Photovoltaic Centre of Excellence already held the world record of 24.7 per cent for silicon solar cell efficiency. Now a revision of the international standard by which solar cells are measured, has delivered the significant 25 per cent record to the team led by Professors Martin Green and Stuart Wenham and widened their lead on the rest of the world.
Read more at http://www.eng.unsw.edu.au/news/2008/1031.htm

Ocean Special Area Management Plan
"The Rhode Island Ocean SAMP, or Ocean Special Area Management Plan, will define use zones for Rhode Island’s offshore waters through a research and planning process that integrates the best available science with open public input and involvement. ... Research projects undertaken by URI scientists will provide the essential scientific basis for Ocean SAMP policy development. These projects assess wind speeds, appropriate technologies, marine life, geology, meteorology, and more. Information about each project is available on the Ocean SAMP web site."
Read more at http://seagrant.gso.uri.edu/oceansamp/

Race Starts With Little Fuel, and Goes Uphill From There
"By JESSE McKINLEY Published: October 12, 2008 BERKELEY, Calif. — It is a classic road rally, 600 miles from the liberal embrace of Berkeley to the anything-goes lights of Las Vegas. No speeding is allowed, or in some cases even possible. And if you stop to refuel, it had better be in someone’s trash. On Saturday, five teams began the Escape From Berkeley, maybe the world’s most eco-friendly motor race, driving all manner of alternative-fuel-burning jalopies, roadsters, and even a frying oil-fueled Mercedes-Benz, with a single goal: to complete the race using no petroleum. "
Read more at http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/13/us/13eco.html?_r=1&partner=permalink&oref=slogin

Research seeks to replace service dogs with robots
by R. Colin Johnson."Service dogs assist the disabled by fetching medications and opening drawers and doors, but they are expensive--about $16,000 per dog. They also take two years to train and there are not enough service dogs to meet the growing demand. By designing a robot that obeys the same verbal commands as service dogs, Georgia Tech researchers said they are aiming to increase the supply of inexpensive robots to fill the multi-year waiting list for service dogs. ... The first phase of the research yielded a point-and-click laser that allows the disabled to gesture by painting the object to be fetched with a laser pointer. The device directs the robot to see the object needed. The simple interface allows disabled persons to accurately indicate objects to be fetched. By itself, however, it cannot communicate more complex tasks like opening a door or drawer. Luckily, verbal commands already exist for service dogs to accomplish these tasks, which is what prompted Kemp to develop the robotic service dog.
Read more at http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=211601091

Ruth Charney on Modeling with Cubes
[Macromedia Flash Player] The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) continues to build on their already solid online presence with the addition of this lecture by noted mathematician and scholar Professor Ruth Charney. This particular lecture was given at the MAA's Carriage House Conference Center in the fall of 2008 and it deals with how cubes can be used to represent a variety of systems. As Charney notes, "The geometry of these spaces is strange, complicated, and a lot of fun to study." Visitors to the site can watch several particularly lucid examples from Charney's talk, read her biography, and also read a detailed interview with her conducted by Michael Pearson. [KMG] Copyright Internet Scout, 1994-2008. Internet Scout (http://scout.wisc.edu/), located in the Computer Sciences Department of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides information about the Internet to the U.S. research and education community under a grant from the National Science Foundation, number NCR-9712163. The Government has certain rights in this material. Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of the entire Scout Report provided this paragraph, including the copyright notice, are preserved on all copies.
Read more at http://www.maa.org/news/102308charney.html  

Scientists Engineer Superconducting Thin Films
" One step closer to fabrication of useful devices such as superconductive transistors October 8, 2008 UPTON, NY - One major goal on the path toward making useful superconducting devices has been engineering materials that act as superconductors at the nanoscale — the realm of billionths of a meter. Such nanoscale superconductors would be useful in devices such as superconductive transistors and eventually in ultrafast, power-saving electronics. In the October 9, 2008, issue of Nature, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory report that they have successfully produced two-layer thin films where neither layer is superconducting on its own, but which exhibit a nanometer-thick region of superconductivity at their interface. Furthermore, they demonstrate the ability to elevate the temperature of superconductivity at this interface to temperatures exceeding 50 kelvin (-370°F), a relatively high temperature deemed more practical for real-world devices. "
Read more at http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/PR_display.asp?prID=822

Tutorial on searching the Internet for images
"Welcome to Internet for Image Searching Would you like to learn how to use the Internet to find copyright cleared images for your work, quickly and efficiently? Use this free, interactive tutorial to improve your image searching skills. This tutorial has been created by TASI (the JISC Advisory service for Digital Media) and Intute as part of the Intute: Virtual Training Suite. The tutorial was funded and supported by the Academy / JISC Collaboration.
Read more at http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/he/tutorial/imagesearching

Whales to Wood, Wood to Coal/Oil- What’s Next?
Video by Daniel Nocera W. M. Keck Professor of Energy and Professor of Chemistry. "Nocera advises his audience to put aside dreams that biomass or nuclear energy will give us what we need. Plaster the entire planet with crops we can convert to energy, and you’d still only get seven to 10 terawatts. ... His alternative for saving the planet is “far from pragmatism and reality.” Nocera’s ultimate solution seems almost magical: “water plus light equals oil.” The proposal is to emulate photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert the energy of sunlight to fuel. Scientists are racing to design structures that can catch light the way a leaf does, then capture the energy of this light using chemical bonds, and then somehow store this energy. Some researchers are focusing on photobiological water splitting. Nocera’s group is working “on a wireless current, an artificial leaf.” While the goal “is to see what nature’s structures tell you,” Nocera acknowledges that “if you try to place what’s in nature in a beaker, it probably won’t work.” "
View the video and read more at http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/518/

When models outgrow hardware, turn to HPC
". Computer-aided engineering (CAE) models are becoming too large to run on a single CPU. Paul Schreier looks at how affordable HPC changes all the rules Scientific Computing World: October/November 2008 As engineers discover the power of computer simulation, they want to work on ever-larger models, today some having hundreds of millions of degrees of freedom (DOFs). This desire is going hand-inhand with the evolution of HPC systems, whether multicore processors, multiprocessor servers or clusters. In the past we could count on higher CPU clock rates to speed up analyses, but power consumption and heat became a problem. The solution was to put multiple cores on one piece of silicon and step back clock speeds. However, until independent software vendors (ISVs) take into account the multicore nature of today’s systems, the performance of some applications could even decrease due to competition for memory bandwidth and I/O. "
Read more at http://www.scientific-computing.com/features/feature.php?feature_id=213

Comments have been closed on this topic.